Past Lectures

Naville, Griffith & the Legacy of the Great Temple at Bubastis

  • Posted on: 23 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Edouard Naville and Francis Llewellyn Griffith are often referred to as the first archaeologists to see the importance and grandeur of the Great Temple at Bubastis and it is their descriptions and findings which continue to draw modern day archaeologists to the site of the once magnificent temple and city.

Speaker: 
Matthew Prythero
Speaker Bio: 
Matthew Prythero is the current Treasurer of the Egyptian Study Society. He has a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Bachelor of Science in Anthropology from the University of Denver after graduating in 2016. Matthew has been interested in Ancient Egyptian history since his primary school days and has studied specifically on the feline worship culture and the city of Bubastis. Matthew currently works for the U.S. Department of State where he continues to pursue his dedication to the preservation of the past through diplomatic and economics means.

Egyptian Old Kingdom Pyramids

  • Posted on: 23 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Join us while we travel through the development of the Egyptian pyramids, from the pit “mastaba” tombs to the gigantic wonders at Giza. We will examine how low flat mud brick tomb structures came to be built of stone and stacked, resulting in the Step Pyramid.

Speaker: 
Jim Lowdermilk
Speaker Bio: 
Jim Lowdermilk is a past-President of the Egyptian Study Society. He currently manages the ESS website and is on the Speaker’s Committee. Jim has his BA and MA in Applied Mathematics. He has published papers in the Ostracon, the Journal of the Egyptian Study Socety, and presented his research to the American Research Center in Egypt as well as the Egyptian Study Society. His interests in Egyptology include the Egyptian calendar, mathematics, pyramids, and astronomy.

TT255: Roy’s Tomb

  • Posted on: 23 January 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, November 21, 2016

We will take a tour of this small but exquisite 18th Dynasty tomb, with a chance to see all the remaining decorations. Along the way, we will find what is typical about this tomb for its location, date and owner’s status – and we will see what is different.

Speaker: 
Jan Stremme
Speaker Bio: 
Jan Stremme is not an Egyptologist – her only formal academic credit is a bachelor’s degree in English. However, she has been an active member of the ESS for twenty years, so she has absorbed bits of information from books, lectures, seminars, and informal classes. She has also been fortunate enough to travel to Egypt several times with some of her most learned friends.

Lost and Found: The Journey of a New Kingdom Sarcophagus from Antiquity to the Present

  • Posted on: 16 October 2016
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, October 17, 2016

This talk centers around the stone sarcophagus of a New Kingdom mayor from Herakleopolis found at the turn of the 20th century by Sir Flinders Petrie and Guy Brunton. Stone sarcophagi, while the norm for royalty, are quite rare for officials, especially those who held office in provincial Egypt.

Speaker: 
Kevin Johnson
Speaker Bio: 
Kevin Johnson is Assistant Professor of History at Taylor University in Upland, IN. His research agenda centers on the late 19th and early 20th dynasties, a pivotal point in Egyptian history. Within the context of this period, he has addressed the global issues of legitimacy, political machinations of figures behind the throne and problems of succession and transition of power. Additionally, he was the lead author of an article published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Egyptian History and the popular-level book The Names of the Kings of Egypt. Dr. Johnson has led a number of academic tours to Egypt, primarily in Cairo and Luxor, and participated in an archaeological season for the University of Arizona at the mortuary temple of one of Egypt’s few female rulers, Tausret.

Egyptian Medicine: Was It Art or Science?

  • Posted on: 9 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, October 20, 2014

Ancient Egyptian medicine was trial by error in every sense. Several medical treatises have been discovered, but these surviving documents appear to have written during the late Middle to New Kingdom dynasties. However many Egyptologists agree that they are copies made from earlier documents.

Speaker: 
Jim Turley
Speaker Bio: 
Jim has a Pharm.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is currently the Director of Pharmacy of a local hospital. His clinical focus is in infectious diseases. Jim has recently graduated from the University of Manchester with a Certificate in Egyptology.

Senenmut: Was the Man Behind the Door a Power Behind the Throne

  • Posted on: 9 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, September 15, 2014

According to Egyptologist Peter Dorman, “Senenmut may justifiably be described as one of the most eminent and influential persons of the Eighteenth Dynasty.” Living during the reign of Thutmosis III and Hatshepsut, he achieved high rank with titles including Tutor of the King’s Daughter (that is Hatshepsut’s daughter, Neferure), Overseer of all the Works of the King, and High Steward of Amun.

Speaker: 
Bonnie Sampsell
Speaker Bio: 
Dr. Bonnie Sampsell was a professor of genetics. She has spent the last twenty years traveling to Egypt and studying Egyptology. She is the author of a book, The Geology of Egypt: a traveler’s handbook as well as numerous articles in The Ostracon. She has also been published in Kmt and Al Ahram Newspaper. She serves as Guest Curator of the Egyptian Collection at the Wayne County Historical Museum in her hometown of Richmond, Indiana.

Reconstructing Ancient Masterpieces

  • Posted on: 11 May 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, June 17, 2013

The focus of this lecture will be to show examples of Floyd Chapman's work while discussing the iconography of each piece, as well as, his reconstruction methodology.

Speaker: 
Floyd Chapman
Speaker Bio: 
A twenty year member of the ESS, Floyd Chapman is a digital archaeological illustrator and epigrapher, specializing in the art of the ancient world in general and the art of ancient Egypt specifically. His specialty is doing full color reconstructions of Egyptian temple and tomb scenes that have lost most or all of their original color, so that you can see how they were originally painted. He has been studying the techniques of the ancient masters for the last 22 years in order to be able to reconstruct their art. In addition to being trained in fine arts, he was educated as a cultural anthropologist and ancient historian. He is a multimedia graphic design professor at Front Range Community College and President of the Amarna Research Foundation.

The Myth of Memphis: The Construction of an Ancient Egyptian Capital

  • Posted on: 1 May 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, March 18, 2013

The status of Memphis as the earliest capital of a unified Egyptian state has gone unquestioned in Egyptology. The basic modern reconstruction of the foundation of the city follows closely the reports of the Classical visitor, Herodotus, who transmits the native tradition of Memphis as being founded by the first king of Egypt, Min.

Speaker: 
Matthew J. Adams
Speaker Bio: 
Matthew received his PhD in History from the Pennsylvania State University in 2007, specializing in Egyptology and Near Eastern Archaeology. He has more than 20 seasons of excavation experience at sites in Egypt and Israel. While he has broad interests in space and time throughout the ancient world, his primary research focus is on the development of urban communities in 3rd Millennium Egypt and Levant. In addition to directing a research and excavation project in Israel, the Jezreel Valley Regional Project, he is also a member of the Penn State excavations at Mendes, Egypt, and the Tel Aviv University Megiddo Expedition. He is also President of the non-profit organization, American Archaeology Abroad.

The Amarna Royal Statuary Project

  • Posted on: 8 May 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, September 17, 2012

The current British expedition at Tell el-Amarna began in 1977. Since then, many hundreds of statuary fragments from royal buildings in Akhenaten and Nefertiti's ancient city have been recovered. Most of these were pieces discovered by the German expedition of the pre-World War I era and the Egypt Exploration Society’s team in the 1920s and 1930s.

Speaker: 
Kristin Thompson
Speaker Bio: 
Kristin Thompson is a film historian by profession, having received her Ph.D. in cinema studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1977. In 1992, she took a tour of Egypt and became fascinated by the Amarna period and particularly its art. Reading intensively in the subject and eventually presenting papers at the annual conferences of the American Research Center in Egypt, she eventually began to publish scholarly articles on Amarna reliefs. In 2000, Barry Kemp invited Thompson to join the British expedition at Amarna to register stone fragments. She has spent ten seasons at Amarna, not only registering pieces but also making hundreds of matches among the fragments. One pair statue of Nefertiti and Akhenaten that she has reconstructed matches onto a well-known head from the Thutmose workshop now in the Egyptian Museum in Berlin. Thompson has lectured at the British Museum, the Bolton Museum, the University of Auckland, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where in 2011 she was a Sylvan C. and Pamela C. Coleman Memorial Fellow. She has published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, Ancient Egypt, Egyptian Archaeology, and the Journal of the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities. She has also contributed to the festschrift for Barry Kemp and has an essay on composite statuary in the catalogue of the upcoming exhibition in Berlin, “Nefertiti at 100,” celebrating the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the bust of Nefertiti and the Thutmose workshop.

An Investigation of Egyptian Feline Goddesses and Animal Cults

  • Posted on: 9 May 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, April 16, 2012

This lecture will introduce an unusual statuette of a crouching female deity with a lion's head, from the Brooklyn Museum's collection. The animal or combined human-animal forms of numerous divinities in the ancient Egyptian pantheon reveal the significant qualities of each deity. This talk will focus on the statue, exploring the diverse roles of felines within ancient Egyptian religion.

Speaker: 
Yekaterina Barbash
Speaker Bio: 
Assistant Curator, Arts of Ancient Egypt, the Brooklyn Museum

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