Past Lectures

Naville, Griffith & the Legacy of the Great Temple at Bubastis

  • Posted on: 23 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Edouard Naville and Francis Llewellyn Griffith are often referred to as the first archaeologists to see the importance and grandeur of the Great Temple at Bubastis and it is their descriptions and findings which continue to draw modern day archaeologists to the site of the once magnificent temple and city.

Speaker: 
Matthew Prythero
Speaker Bio: 
Matthew Prythero is the current Treasurer of the Egyptian Study Society. He has a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Bachelor of Science in Anthropology from the University of Denver after graduating in 2016. Matthew has been interested in Ancient Egyptian history since his primary school days and has studied specifically on the feline worship culture and the city of Bubastis. Matthew currently works for the U.S. Department of State where he continues to pursue his dedication to the preservation of the past through diplomatic and economics means.

Egyptian Old Kingdom Pyramids

  • Posted on: 23 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Join us while we travel through the development of the Egyptian pyramids, from the pit “mastaba” tombs to the gigantic wonders at Giza. We will examine how low flat mud brick tomb structures came to be built of stone and stacked, resulting in the Step Pyramid.

Speaker: 
Jim Lowdermilk
Speaker Bio: 
Jim Lowdermilk is a past-President of the Egyptian Study Society. He currently manages the ESS website and is on the Speaker’s Committee. Jim has his BA and MA in Applied Mathematics. He has published papers in the Ostracon, the Journal of the Egyptian Study Socety, and presented his research to the American Research Center in Egypt as well as the Egyptian Study Society. His interests in Egyptology include the Egyptian calendar, mathematics, pyramids, and astronomy.

TT255: Roy’s Tomb

  • Posted on: 23 January 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, November 21, 2016

We will take a tour of this small but exquisite 18th Dynasty tomb, with a chance to see all the remaining decorations. Along the way, we will find what is typical about this tomb for its location, date and owner’s status – and we will see what is different.

Speaker: 
Jan Stremme
Speaker Bio: 
Jan Stremme is not an Egyptologist – her only formal academic credit is a bachelor’s degree in English. However, she has been an active member of the ESS for twenty years, so she has absorbed bits of information from books, lectures, seminars, and informal classes. She has also been fortunate enough to travel to Egypt several times with some of her most learned friends.

Lost and Found: The Journey of a New Kingdom Sarcophagus from Antiquity to the Present

  • Posted on: 16 October 2016
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, October 17, 2016

This talk centers around the stone sarcophagus of a New Kingdom mayor from Herakleopolis found at the turn of the 20th century by Sir Flinders Petrie and Guy Brunton. Stone sarcophagi, while the norm for royalty, are quite rare for officials, especially those who held office in provincial Egypt.

Speaker: 
Kevin Johnson
Speaker Bio: 
Kevin Johnson is Assistant Professor of History at Taylor University in Upland, IN. His research agenda centers on the late 19th and early 20th dynasties, a pivotal point in Egyptian history. Within the context of this period, he has addressed the global issues of legitimacy, political machinations of figures behind the throne and problems of succession and transition of power. Additionally, he was the lead author of an article published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Egyptian History and the popular-level book The Names of the Kings of Egypt. Dr. Johnson has led a number of academic tours to Egypt, primarily in Cairo and Luxor, and participated in an archaeological season for the University of Arizona at the mortuary temple of one of Egypt’s few female rulers, Tausret.

Egyptian Medicine: Was It Art or Science?

  • Posted on: 9 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, October 20, 2014

Ancient Egyptian medicine was trial by error in every sense. Several medical treatises have been discovered, but these surviving documents appear to have written during the late Middle to New Kingdom dynasties. However many Egyptologists agree that they are copies made from earlier documents.

Speaker: 
Jim Turley
Speaker Bio: 
Jim has a Pharm.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is currently the Director of Pharmacy of a local hospital. His clinical focus is in infectious diseases. Jim has recently graduated from the University of Manchester with a Certificate in Egyptology.

Senenmut: Was the Man Behind the Door a Power Behind the Throne

  • Posted on: 9 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, September 15, 2014

According to Egyptologist Peter Dorman, “Senenmut may justifiably be described as one of the most eminent and influential persons of the Eighteenth Dynasty.” Living during the reign of Thutmosis III and Hatshepsut, he achieved high rank with titles including Tutor of the King’s Daughter (that is Hatshepsut’s daughter, Neferure), Overseer of all the Works of the King, and High Steward of Amun.

Speaker: 
Bonnie Sampsell
Speaker Bio: 
Dr. Bonnie Sampsell was a professor of genetics. She has spent the last twenty years traveling to Egypt and studying Egyptology. She is the author of a book, The Geology of Egypt: a traveler’s handbook as well as numerous articles in The Ostracon. She has also been published in Kmt and Al Ahram Newspaper. She serves as Guest Curator of the Egyptian Collection at the Wayne County Historical Museum in her hometown of Richmond, Indiana.

In Praise of Tomb Robbers

  • Posted on: 18 January 2011
  • By: mprythero
Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Robbing tombs in dynastic Egypt was a perilous occupation. Silence needed to be bought from high officials and fellow villagers. Access had to be secured. Breaking into tombs was hard work. Disaster could befall the robbers at any time. The punishment, if caught, was torture and death for robbers and often their families. But balanced against disaster was the promise of unimaginable wealth. Egypt was plagued by tomb robberies throughout her history.

Egyptian Scarabs: The Archaeology and Symbolism of a Unique Artifact

  • Posted on: 5 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

The scarab amulet is the single most abundant artifact to have survived from ancient Egypt, and hundreds of thousands, if not millions, were made throughout the course of Egyptian history. Today, scarabs continue to be found on excavations throughout Egypt and elsewhere with thousands residing in museum collections around the world.

Speaker: 
Richard H. Wilkinson
Speaker Bio: 
Richard H. Wilkinson is Regents Professor of Egyptian Archaeology at the University of Arizona. He is the Director of the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition, which has conducted archaeological projects in Egypt for over twenty years and is now excavating the memorial temple of Queen Tausert – the nineteenth dynasty pharaoh who ruled Egypt as a king at the time of Homer’s Troy. The author of over a hundred articles and reviews as well as eight acclaimed books – including the recent Egyptian Scarabs – Professor Wilkinson has received many honors in the field of Egyptian archaeology and is the editor of the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections.

Egypt: New Discoveries in an Ancient Land

  • Posted on: 5 February 2017
  • By: mprythero

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Date: 
Monday, July 20, 2009

It has been estimated that only one-third of the Ancient Egyptian archaeological sites have been found so far, and new discoveries are being made almost daily. Many of those recent discoveries have been made on the Giza Plateau, in the shadow of the famous pyramids, and at nearby Saqqara and Abu Sir.

Speaker: 
Mahmoud Khodier
Speaker Bio: 
Mahmoud Khodier is a renowned Egyptologist and tour guide. Born in Memphis, Egypt, he holds degrees from both Al Azhar University and Cairo University. His expertise, sensitivity, sense of humor and enthusiasm for Egyptian archaeology has put him in great demand as a popular lecturer throughout Egypt and the United States.

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