January 2018

Date: 
Monday, January 8, 2018

The phrase "Egyptian Archaeology" immediately conjures up an image of a hot, dry, dusty landscape possibly with a few pyramids in the distance. While not inaccurate, it is only part of the picture. Most civilizations, ancient and modern, thrive on long-distance trade. And for countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea that means port cities, ships, and shipping have always played an integral part in their prosperity. But it has only been within the last 50 years that archaeologists have turned their attention to the physical remains beneath the waves. In this lecture, I will present an overview of the relatively new field of maritime archaeology, recent finds, and its potential for the future.

Jeanne Nijhowne

Jeanne Nijhowne holds a PhD in Middle Eastern archaeology and currently works at CU Boulder.

From Jeanne:
I decided to become a Near Eastern archaeologist at age 11 after reading a book on the six great, ancient civilizations. That determination never wavered. My first overseas dig was at the site of Nagada, a third millennium B.C. site about a half hour north of Luxor, Egypt in 1981. I returned to Egypt in 1992 to work at Abu Sha’ar, a Roman fort on the beach of the Red Sea. Both before and after my Egyptian trips, I participated in archaeological excavations in Iraq, Turkey, Jordan, and Syria. I was part of the permanent staff at Tell Mozan in northeastern Syria until the war started in 2011. Along the way, I earned a PhD in Anthropology with a specialty in Near Eastern archaeology. I wrote my dissertation on Old Babylonian and Kassite cylinder seals. I also discovered a passion for teaching. I’ve taught anthropology and archaeology courses at Binghamton University, Hartwick College, and SUNY-Oneonta all in upstate New York and at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. I currently teach “The Archaeology of Mesopotamia in the Second Millennium BC” and “Religion and Politics of Ancient Egypt” at CU Boulder and take the opportunity to lecture about Near Eastern archaeology whenever the opportunity arises.

Date: 
Monday, November 20, 2017

This lecture will explore some of the distinctive features that made Egyptian textiles one of the great wonders of the ancient world. An experienced spinner and a member of the Rocky Mountain Weavers’ Guild, Rhonda K. Hageman will discuss characteristics of flax fiber, compare European spinning techniques with the fiber preparing methods unique to Egypt, and describe the process of linen weaving used in the dynastic period.

Date: 
Monday, October 16, 2017

Ancient Egyptian Magic 101 is an introduction to the magical concepts of the ancient Egyptians. Building upon his 2016 ESS presentation: Ancient Egyptian Religion 101, Cherf completes the synthesis. This presentation will point out: our modern cultural hang-ups and all too perfect image of Egyptian culture, that their religious and medicinal practices depended upon magic, that heka—“magic,” is an extremely old and long-lived belief system, that Egyptian magic wasn’t taboo, but rather was a legally acceptable practice used by all levels of society, and that heka itself was comprised of three parts: the spoken word, materials used, and ritual. Cherf will end the presentation with a blood-chilling example.

Bill Cherf

Bill Cherf is a long-time member and officer of ESS. He holds a PhD in ancient history. One of Cherf’s proudest academic moments was his participation in the official opening of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, in Alexandria, Egypt, on September 26-28th, 2004. Cherf has since donated his entire academic research library to that fine institution.

Date: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Birket Habu — ‘the lake of Habu’ — is the modern name for the outline of a huge basin on the edge of the Nile floodplain not far south of the temple of Medinet Habu. Although now entirely filled with sediment its outline is defined by embankments and hills of excavated sediment which define a rectangle of roughly 2 x 1 km, with an outward turn in the middle of the (local) east side, which creates a T-shape. Around its north-west corner it runs adjacent to the remains of a mud-brick town of the reign of Amenhetep III. Known today as Malkata, it contained palaces. To judge from many inscribed objects the celebration of at least two of Amenhetep III’s jubilees were held here.

The purpose of the Birket Habu remains uncertain. The lecture looks at the evidence for dating it to Amenhetep III’s reign and considers whether it served as a harbour or was a place for water-borne ceremonies. Both it and the adjacent palaces and town of Malkata flourished only a few years before the accession of Amenhetep IV/Akhenaten. Although he nowhere appears in the tomb and temple scenes which record the jubilee festivals it is reasonable to think that he would have witnessed them. Does the site, therefore, make a contribution to understanding Amarna?

There is a personal side to the lecture. In 1969 and the early ‘70s I carried out survey and excavation at the site on behalf of David O’Connor and the University Museum of Pennsylvania. The lecture draws heavily on these results. The experience introduced me to the archaeology of the late Eighteenth Dynasty and helped me to focus on the idea of starting work at Amarna, which I did a few years later

Berry Kemp

Professor Barry Kemp, is Professor Emeritus of Egyptology at the University of Cambridge and is currently directing excavations at Amarna in Egypt. His widely renowned book Ancient Egypt: Anatomy of a Civilisation is a core text of Egyptology as well as many Ancient History courses. Professor Kemp graduated at the University of Liverpool in 1962. The next year, he became a Lecturer at the University of Cambridge and later became a Professor there. From 1977 until 2008, he has been the director of excavation and archaeological survey at Amarna for the Egypt Exploration Society. In 1990, Kemp was elected a Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge. He was Professor of Egyptology at the University of Cambridge until his retirement in 2007. In 2008, he became a Fellow of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. Professor Kemp continues his research of the Amarna Period of ancient Egypt as director of the Armarna Project.

He has also contributed to many highly regarded and widely used Egyptology texts, including Civilisations of the Ancient Near East, and is a co-author of Bruce Trigger's Ancient Egypt: A Social History, which incorporates the work of many leading Egyptologists and addresses recent trends in the subject. Kemp states to be interested in developing a holistic picture of the Ancient Egyptian society rather than focusing on the elite culture that dominates the archaeological record: "This holistic approach involves explaining the present appearance of the site in terms of all the agencies at work..."

Kemp was elected Fellow of the British Academy (FBA) in 1992, and was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2011 New Year Honors for services to archaeology, education and international relations in Egypt.

Date: 
Monday, August 14, 2017

Labor mobilization at the Karnak Temple Complex in Egypt provides a unique understanding of authority among Egyptian pharaohs as Karnak was aggrandized by various pharaohs over a span of 2,000 years. Periods of monumental building at Karnak are strongly correlated with the variables of warfare and administrative centralization, suggesting that rulers with greater sociopolitical power expressed it through programs at Karnak, and likewise justified their authority, divine rulership, and political and military actions.

Michael Kolb

Michael Kolb is Professor of Anthropology at Metropolitan State University of Denver, and Presidential Teaching Professor Emeritus at Northern Illinois University. He has undertaken architectural labor investment studies for twenty-eight years in both the Pacific and the Mediterranean, and currently works in Western Sicily.

Date: 
Monday, March 20, 2017

In the late 14th century B.C., a ship carrying over 20 tons of cargo sank off the coast of Turkey. But this ancient tragedy has proved to be one of the most exciting archaeological finds of the 20th century! For the Uluburun shipwreck, as it is now known, is that rarest of discoveries, a moment frozen in time. Its contents can be assigned to at least seven different cultures ranging from Greece to Mesopotamia and Syria to Nubia. The shipwreck, the oldest found to date, reveals the tangible evidence of the vibrant Mediterranean trading network only alluded to in the Amarna letters.

Jeanne Nijhowne

Jeanne Nijhowne holds a PhD in Middle Eastern archaeology and currently works at CU Boulder.

From Jeanne:
I decided to become a Near Eastern archaeologist at age 11 after reading a book on the six great, ancient civilizations. That determination never wavered. My first overseas dig was at the site of Nagada, a third millennium B.C. site about a half hour north of Luxor, Egypt in 1981. I returned to Egypt in 1992 to work at Abu Sha’ar, a Roman fort on the beach of the Red Sea. Both before and after my Egyptian trips, I participated in archaeological excavations in Iraq, Turkey, Jordan, and Syria. I was part of the permanent staff at Tell Mozan in northeastern Syria until the war started in 2011. Along the way, I earned a PhD in Anthropology with a specialty in Near Eastern archaeology. I wrote my dissertation on Old Babylonian and Kassite cylinder seals. I also discovered a passion for teaching. I’ve taught anthropology and archaeology courses at Binghamton University, Hartwick College, and SUNY-Oneonta all in upstate New York and at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. I currently teach “The Archaeology of Mesopotamia in the Second Millennium BC” and “Religion and Politics of Ancient Egypt” at CU Boulder and take the opportunity to lecture about Near Eastern archaeology whenever the opportunity arises.

Date: 
Monday, April 17, 2017

Karnak Temple evolved from its humble beginnings in the Middle Kingdom into the largest religious site in the world. Numerous pharaohs expanded, modified and renovated this "home of the god." David Pepper will describe how this fabulous Temple developed over its 2,000 year history, and reveal stories about some of its lesser known components.

David Pepper

David Pepper is a retired engineer with a lifelong interest in Ancient Egypt. He has visited the land of the pharaohs numerous times, and was one of the founders of the Denver-based Ancient Egyptian Study Society (ESS).

David has presented many lectures about Ancient Egypt around the Denver-Boulder area, and was a former editor of the ESS publications, The Ostracon, and Scribe’s Palette.

David is currently vice-president on the Board of Trustees of The Amarna Research Foundation, a fund-raising organization that supports excavations and conservation projects in Egypt, and is editor of their publication, The Akhetaten Sun.
He has been collecting Ancient Egyptian themed memorabilia for a number of years, and enjoys searching antique malls and flea markets looking for “Egyptana.”

Date: 
Monday, May 15, 2017

While tattooing is an increasingly popular topic, it is rarely discussed in the past owing to the infrequent identification of tattoos in human remains. This is particularly true in dynastic Egypt, where physical evidence of tattooing was limited to a set of three female Middle Kingdom mummies from Deir el-Bahri with Nubian geometric patterns placed on their arms and abdomens. During the 2014-2015 mission of the Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale at Deir el-Medina, however, our team identified the mummy of a woman with over thirty separate, figural tattoos placed along her arms, neck, and shoulders. These tattoos offer our only evidence of Pharaonic tattooing to date and provide us an unusual glimpse into the world of tattooing and worship in daily life.
This talk reviews the significance of this tattooed mummy from Deir el-Medina through a systematic analysis of the placement, orientation, order, and symbolism of her tattoos. These tattoos created a permanent and public association of this woman with worship of the goddess Hathor, even allowing her body to be used as a potential vehicle for the goddess herself through the repeated motif of the divine Wadjet eyes. This mummy therefore not only offers a unique and significant contribution to our understanding of the practice of tattooing in ancient Egypt, but also the potential roles of women in religious worship in ancient Egypt.

Anne Austin

No biography available.

Date: 
Monday, June 19, 2017

This talk places Nefertiti's "Sunshade of Re" temple - Kom el-Nana, Tell el-Amarna, in context of inscriptions relating to other Sunshades of Re, in particular those relating to the Sunshade of Re of Hatshepsut. While the Sunshade of Re at Kom el-Nana served the solar cult of the Aten, over seen by the regenerative aspects of Nefertiti, it also served as a locus for the mortuary cults of the non-royal or noble courtiers at Tell el-Amarna. It is also proposed that Kom el-Nana could have been understood as a type of mortuary locale, with the added possibility that all Aten temples at Amarna may have had a similar function.

Jackie Williamson

Jacquelyn Williamson, earned her PhD and MA from Johns Hopkins University in Egyptology and Near Eastern studies, and her BA from Sarah Lawrence College. Her research interests include history, philology, art, and archaeology. Her research and teaching interests also include ancient trade, technology, language, and art. She specializes in the Amarna Period, approximately 1353-1336 BCE, ruled over by the noted iconoclasts and so-called 'heretics' Akhenaten and Nefertiti. As a member of the expedition to Tell el-Amarna since 2005, Williamson's work concentrates on reconstructing and analyzing an Amarna period temple found at the site called Kom el-Nana at Tell el-Amarna. She has published several articles contending that the site is both the 'lost' sun temple of Nefertiti as well as another, much less known site.
She has published in a variety of journals, including the Journal of Egyptian Archeology, the Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt, and Les Cahiers Égypte Nilotique et Méditérranéenne.

Date: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

The interior layout of the Great Pyramid is unique among all the Egyptian pyramids with not only the greatest number of interior rooms, but also the ingenuity needed to construct them. Of particular interest is the Grand Gallery with its sloping floor and slanted corbel roof and the King's Chamber with its high flat ceiling. The ascending passage, leading to the Grand Gallery, was filled with plug blocks that were initially stored in the gallery above. The effort was made to block this passage despite the fact that a tunnel, now called the well shaft, allowed access around this blockage. Why was the passage even filled and how was it filled? Attend this lecture to find out the surprising answers.

Robert Lowdermilk

Robert H. Lowdermilk is a Denver native who has spent most of his life in the highway construction industry in Colorado and surrounding states. He has over 47 years of highway construction and management experience in his family owned Construction Company and related businesses. In his capacity as president, vice president or owner he has been involved in highways, railroads, site developments, utilities, dams, water projects, and sand and gravel production. Bob graduated from the University of Denver in 1961, earning a B.S. in Business Management. He served several years on the Board of Directors of the Colorado Contractors Association and was president in 1980. He was a member of the Construction Equipment Committee of the Transportation Research Board on the National Research Council for over 20 years. He served many years on the Industry Advisory Committee of the Industrial Management Program at Colorado State University. He also served many years on the Board of Directors of ADA-ES, a pollution abatement company. He served as a Commissioner on the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission for nine years. Has been a Mason for over 50 years is a Shriner and is a Rotarian and was a member of the Board of Denver Rotary 31. Bob is a sculptor and is an amateur Egyptologist and was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Amarna Research Foundation and was on the Technical Advisory Committee of the Ancient Egypt Research Association and the Long Range Planning Committee of the American Research Center in Egypt. He and his wife Ann, who graduated from the University of Colorado as a Theoretical Mathematician, have 3 grown Children, 4 Grandchildren, 1 Step Granddaughter and 2 Step Great Grandchildren.

Pages